Browsing the "heating" Tag

Guest Post: DOE Backs Down on Higher Furnace Efficiency Standards; Air Conditioning Standards also Being Challenged

May 5th, 2013 | by GBE FACTS

In late 2011, the Department of Energy (DOE) announced increases in the minimum efficiency standards of residential furnaces and air conditioners. In the 30 northern states, the minimum efficiency rating of new furnaces was to be raised to 90 percent from its current level of 80 percent, starting May 31st, 2013. In the 20 southern states, the minimum efficiency of air conditioners is set to be raised from 13 SEER to 14 SEER starting January 1st, 2015 (SEER is the estimated BTU’s of cooling provided by each watt-hour of electricity, so a 14 SEER unit will use about 7 percent less energy than a 13 SEER system). These changes were expected to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 113 to 143 million tons, and to reduce residential energy consumption by one-fifth


Turn a Candle Into a Radiator

January 16th, 2008 | by Sarah Nagy

Today is a cold, wet dreary day. Which inspired me to dig the Kandle Heeter out of the garage. Parked [&hellip


Wood Burning = Green Heat?

February 26th, 2007 | by Philip Proefrock

Heat-Kit.comPhoto Credit: Heat-Kit.com
Heating your house with firewood is completely retro. I mean, cutting up trees and burning them, that's just so old fashioned and inefficient, and not green at all.

Right?

What do you mean, wood burning can be green?

In fact, masonry heaters (which are also sometimes called "Finnish heaters" or "Russian heaters") can be a green source for heating a home. While a traditional fireplace may be only 10% efficient (which is to say not!), a masonry heater can be 90% efficient. A well insulated house (even in a cold, Canadian location) can be heated on a single cord of wood per season. In a sense, a masonry heater is to a traditional fireplace what a compact fluorescent (or, even better, and LED light) is to an incandescent bulb.


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