Smart Surface Technologies Could Save DC $5 Billion

A recent study says that smart surface technologies could save Washington, D.C. $5 billion over 40 years. The report,  Achieving Urban Resilience: Washington, D.C., authored by Capital E, documents and quantifies the large-scale environmental, health and economic benefits that smart surface technologies could provide. “How cities manage the sunlight and rain that falls on them has a huge impact on inhabitants’ health and quality of life,” the report begins. “But city leaders and planners generally do not manage or even…

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Artificial Turf Is The New Green Landscaping

Artificial turf isn’t just for mini golf and football stadiums anymore! It has become the go-to product for homeowners suffering through drought or trying to reduce their water consumption. Tanner Shepard, owner of LawnPop, an Austin, TX turf installation company, says that their brand has been growing at a rapid pace. “Synthetic grass was a great option to help conserve water during the drought,” Shepard said. “Turf is very versatile, and people are getting more creative when it comes to…

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Nano Membrane Toilet Turns Waste Into Clean Power

In the news of the weird in green technology, this product has to be out there! Cranfield University in the UK has developed a toilet, called the nano membrane toilet, that produces clean energy and clean water as by-products of human waste. Here is how Gizmodo describes the “waste processing:” The toilet’s magic happens when you close the lid. The bottom of the bowl uses a rotation mechanism to sweep the waste into a sedimentation chamber, which helps block any…

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Greenhouse with legs

Try This Greenhouse With Legs For Flood Control

For those having a proclivity for flooding paranoia, this greenhouse with legs might arrest some of those fears. Conceived and developed by BAT Studio, we are told this UK structure has been constructed in an area which experiences frequent flooding. The Greenhouse That Grows Legs incorporates a novel approach to flood protection. “The building is fabricated on a bespoke steel frame with four hydraulic legs, capable of lifting the building 800 mm from the ground on command.” The story of…

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Permeable concrete system gulps water

Permeable Concrete System Gulps Water Without Puddles

In a video that has gone viral, at least in the construction industry, Lafarge Tarmac vividly demonstrates the capabilities of its Topmix Permeable Concrete system to absorb large quantities of water in a short amount of time.  According to the video, a parking lot constructed of Topmix is able to absorb 4,000 liters of water in less than a minute, with no puddles! The Topmix system is exactly that, a system.  It starts with a layer of permeable concrete, followed…

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Rain tunnel technology provides drinking water from air

Rain Tunnel Technology Provides Drinking Water from Air

New technology from Bangalore promises clean drinking water by drawing moisture from the air.  Rain Tunnel Technology, invented by Dr Rajah Vijay Kumar, Chief Scientific Officer at the De Scalene Research Organization, will soon be available for both commercial and household use. Getting water from the atmosphere is not new. It has been around for more than 500 years but has never been really successful. All the techniques used up until now were based on condensing the air to extract the…

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Mushrooms Hold Key to Stormwater Treatment

Mycoremediation, the use of fungi to treat water and soil, could be the stormwater filter of the present and future.  A couple of projects in Portland, Oregon are putting the science to the test. According to Wikipedia, “one of the primary roles of fungi in the ecosystem is decomposition, which is performed by the mycelium. The mycelium secretes extracellular enzymes and acids that break down lignin and cellulose, the two main building blocks of plant fiber… The key to mycoremediation…

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Drought-stricken California