Browsing the "Energy Storage" Category

A Battery Made of Wood?

June 20th, 2013 | by pressroom

But don't try it at home yet– the components in the battery tested by scientists at the University of Maryland are a thousand times thinner than a piece of paper. Using sodium instead of lithium, as many rechargeable batteries do, makes the battery environmentally benign. Sodium doesn't store energy as efficiently as lithium, so you won't see this battery in your cell phone -- instead, its low cost and common materials would make it ideal to store huge amounts of energy at once – such as solar energy at a power plant


A Journey through the Natural Building Techniques: Adobe

May 21st, 2013 | by Kata Polano

The word adobe comes from the Arabic word al-tob, which means “the brick” and from Coptic tube, which also means “brick”. A brick is precisely what adobe is, a sun-dried brick of clay-soil and sand, with fiber added in some instances as well. These fibers, which add tensile strength, are usually straw, hair, or even horse manure. Yes, I said horse manure! Building with adobe is one of the oldest building techniques in the world, and some of the world’s oldest standing buildings were constructed with adobe


Bacteria Use Hydrogen and Carbon Dioxide to Produce Electricity

May 20th, 2013 | by Glenn Meyers

Researchers have engineered a strain of electricity-producing bacteria that can grow using hydrogen gas as its sole electron donor and carbon dioxide as its sole source of carbon. Researchers at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst report their findings at the 113th General Meeting of the American Society for Microbiology


Integral Fast Reactors: Nuclear’s Forgotten Clean Energy Solution

April 26th, 2013 | by Glenn Meyers

I wrote a post for CleanTechnica on December 6, 2011 about something I'd never before heard about, integral fast reactors -- you guessed right, nuclear reactors. Titled, "Our Nuclear Trash Heap Needs IFRs," I wrote about a 2008 book by environmentalist, Tom Blees, “Prescription for the Planet."


Better Batteries from Waste Sulfur

April 15th, 2013 | by Glenn Meyers

A new chemical process can transform waste sulfur into a lightweight plastic that may improve batteries for electric cars, reports a University of Arizona-led team. The new plastic has other potential uses, including optical uses


Breakthrough in ‘Bio-Battery’ Development Race

April 1st, 2013 | by pressroom

Scientists at the University of East Anglia have made an important breakthrough in the quest to generate clean electricity from bacteria. New findings show that proteins on the surface of bacteria can produce an electric current by simply touching a mineral surface. The research shows that it is possible for bacteria to lie directly on the surface of a metal or mineral and transfer electrical charge through their cell membranes. This means that it is possible to "tether" bacteria directly to electrodes -- bringing scientists a step closer to creating efficient microbial fuel cells or "bio-batteries."


Discovery on Storing and Reusing Renewable Energy

March 29th, 2013 | by pressroom

"This breakthrough offers a relatively cheaper method of storing and reusing electricity produced by wind turbines and solar panels," says Curtis Berlinguette, associate professor of chemistry and Canada Research Chair in Energy Conversion


Non-toxic Lithium-Ion Battery Packs Revolutionizing Power Tools

March 27th, 2013 | by Guest Contributor

While the green aspects of power tools was not a driving factor in the decisions for most of us in the past, more power and less weight would be the priority, it is one of those topics that has become much more important in recent years and is important enough for our customers to ask about. While using Lithium-Ion battery packs instead of nickel cadmium may not solve the problems of the planet, it won’t hurt it


Lithium-Ion Battery Developed at USC: Cheap and Strong

February 14th, 2013 | by pressroom

Researchers have long attempted to use silicon, which is cheap and has a high potential capacity, in battery anodes. (Anodes are where current flows into a battery, while cathodes are where current flows out.) The problem has been that previous silicon anode designs, which were basically tiny plates of the material, broke down from repeated swelling and shrinking during charging/discharging cycles and quickly became useless


Falling Renewable Energy Costs Send Wake-up Alarm to Policy Makers

January 15th, 2013 | by Glenn Meyers

A press announcement released today from Abu Dhabi concerning a new report issued by the International Renewable Energy Association (IRENA) states, “Renewable energy has entered into a new virtuous cycle of falling costs, increasing deployment, and accelerated technological progress.”


More than 700 Energy Storage Projects are Announced or Operating around the World, According to Pike Research Tracker

December 19th, 2012 | by pressroom

Energy storage projects are increasing steadily, both in terms of the project pipeline and the number of projects deployed and operating. Two factors are influencing that expansion: first, demand for energy storage is increasing as utilities learn more about energy storage technologies and become less risk averse, and second, as the economic outlook brightens, companies are more willing to invest the capital frequently required for energy storage



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