Fuel Cell Innovation by Korean Researchers

This research was published in Scientific Reports on August 13. (Title: Highly Efficient and robust cathode materials for low-temperature solid fuel cells: PrBa0.5Sr0.5Co2-xFexO5+δ )
As high power density devices, fuel cells can convert chemical energy directly into electric power very efficiently and environmentally friendly. Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs), based on an oxide ion conducting electrolyte, have several advantages over other types of fuel cells, including relatively inexpensive material costs, low sensitivity to impurities in the fuel, and high overall efficiency.

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Solectria Renewables to Power the Largest College Solar Installation in North America

Patricia C. Donohue, MCCC President, said the solar farm moves MCCC forward on many fronts. “The solar farm will save critical dollars and enable us to restore to our budget many cuts in programs and services we have made over the past two years. It also helps us fulfill our sustainability goals. We have committed to the American College & University Presidents’ Climate Commitment (ACUPCC) with the goal of achieving carbon neutrality.”

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Radio Waves Carry News of Climate Change

Their research shows that the strength of radio signals on the ground is a reliable indicator of temperature change above. Prof. Price and his team used simple radio antennae on the ground to measure radio waves broadcast by navigational transmitters around the globe, then compared information on the strength of these radio signals with data on temperature fluctuations in the upper atmosphere.

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What Can Plants Reveal about Global Climate Change?

A group of organisms that play a wide variety of crucial roles in our global ecosystems is plants. What role do plants play in helping to regulate climate change and how will they fare in future times? A new series of articles in a Special Issue on Global Biological Change in the American Journal of Botany expands our view on how global changes affect and are affected by plants and offers new ideas to stimulate and advance new collaborative research.

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Harvesting Electricity from Carbon Dioxide

They describe technology that would react the CO2 with water or other liquids and, with further processing, produce a flow of electrons that make up electric current. It could produce about 1,570 billion kilowatts of additional electricity annually if used to harvest CO2 from power plants, industry and residences. That’s about 400 times the annual electrical output of the Hoover Dam.

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Mexico Aims to Cut Emissions, Boost Afforable Housing Via Eco House Program

Having passed a national climate change law in 2012, the Mexican government is turning to an innovative green home loan program to reduce energy consumption and lower the housing sector’s direct and indirect contributions to carbon and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. The Eco House program offers new home buyers housing with energy and emissions-saving features, such as roof insulation and solar water heating, at the same cost as conventionally built affordable housing.

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Solar panel installation

Rooftop Solar Takes Off In California As Costs Decline

California is known for alternative energy enthusiasm and dedication to energy usage reductions. As part of that, back in 2007, the state launched a $3.3 billion effort to install 3,000 MW of new solar capacity over the next decade. California is one of the US states in which the use of solar energy is encouraged most, and this encouragement (because of the California Solar Initiative) has been so successful that a record-breaking 391 MW of solar panels were installed in California…

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Trees Using Water More Efficiently When Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide Rises

The study, “Increase in forest water-use efficiency as atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations rise,” was published on-line today in the journal Nature. Dave Hollinger, a plant physiologist with the U.S. Forest Service’s Northern Research Station, is a co-author with lead author Trevor Keenan of Harvard University and colleagues from The Ohio State University, Indiana University, and the Institute of Meteorology and Climate in Germany.

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