Seattle Adopts Plan for Saving Energy Resources in City-Owned Buildings

Aims to Achieve 20% Energy Savings by 2020 The City of Seattle has adopted a Resource Conservation Management Plan (RCMP) that outlines how the City will reduce energy use in City-owned buildings 20% by 2020. A 20% energy use reduction by 2020 (compared to the 2008 baseline) would also result in utility cost savings of roughly $2.75 million per year after reaching the reduction goal. The RCMP was adopted by City Council resolution 31491 on December 16. While resource conservation is…

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Kinangop Wind Farm in Kenya to be Powered by 38 GE Wind Turbines

One of the Largest Wind Power Generation Projects to be Built in Sub-Saharan Africa The Kinangop Wind Farm in Kenya, developed by Aeolus Kenya and constructed by Iberdrola Engineering, will be powered by 38 GE 1.6-megawatt (MW) wind turbines. The Kinangop facility will be one of the largest wind power generation projects to be built to date in sub-Saharan Africa. Following its commissioning, the 61-MW wind farm will generate enough renewable electricity to power the equivalent of 150,000 homes in the…

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Climate Change Puts 40 Percent More People at Risk of Absolute Water Scarcity: Study

Water scarcity impacts people’s lives in many countries already today. Future population growth will increase the demand for freshwater even further. Yet in addition to this, on the supply side, water resources will be affected by projected changes in rainfall and evaporation. Climate change due to unabated greenhouse-gas emissions within our century is likely to put 40 percent more people at risk of absolute water scarcity than would be without climate change, a new study shows by using an unprecedented…

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Carbon capture technology could be vital for climate targets

The future availability of carbon capture and storage (CCS) will be pivotal in reaching ambitious climate targets, according to a new comprehensive study of future energy technologies from IIASA, the Potsdam Institute for Climate Change, and the Stanford Energy Modeling Forum. The study, published in a special issue of the journal Climatic Change, provides an overview of the results of EMF27, a major research project combining 18 different global energy-economy models from research teams around the world. It examines the…

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NREL Reports Soft Costs Now Largest Piece of Solar Installation Cost

Two detailed reports from the Energy Department’s National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) find that solar financing and other non-hardware costs — often referred to as “soft costs” — now comprise up to 64% of the total price of residential solar energy systems, reflecting how soft costs are becoming an increasingly larger fraction of the cost of installing solar. “The two new reports, along with previous reports, provide a comprehensive look at the full cost of installing solar, while delineating and…

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IHS Report: China’s Power Market Will Overtake That of U.S. and Europe Combined by 2035

China’s power market demands in the last decade of robust economic expansion is unprecedented anywhere in the world, equally matched by the building out of its electric power infrastructure, which has more than tripled in the same period—and most of this growth fueled by coal. Today, however, environmental concerns and urban air pollution are prompting the authorities to opt for cleaner technologies while demand continues to surge. IHS, a global research and analytics firm, recently concluded a study on the…

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Solar Cell Degradation Observed Directly for First Time

X-ray examination shows structural changes in ‘plastics’ solar cells With the help of DESY’s X-ray light source PETRA III, researchers of Technische Universität München have, for the first time, watched organic solar cells degrade in real time. This work could open new approaches to increasing the stability of this highly promising type of solar cell. The team headed by Prof. Peter Müller-Buschbaum from the Technische Universität München (Technical University of Munich) present their observations in this week’s issue of the…

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Deep Carbon Observatory scientists discover quick recipe for producing hydrogen

New formula for fast, abundant H2 production may help power fuel cells, helps explain expansive chemical-eating microbial communities of the deep Scientists in Lyon, a French city famed for its cuisine, have discovered a quick-cook recipe for copious volumes of hydrogen (H2). The breakthrough suggests a better way of producing the hydrogen that propels rockets and energizes battery-like fuel cells. In a few decades, it could even help the world meet key energy needs — without carbon emissions contributing to…

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