gwinston

Grady Winston is an avid writer and internet entrepreneur from Indianapolis. He has worked in the fields of technology, business, marketing, and advertising implementing multiple creative projects and solutions for a range of clients.

Simple Methods May Help Bring Clean Water To Developing Countries

Inadequate waste disposal methods, contaminated water sources and the lack of awareness about proper hand-washing all contribute to the spread of waterborne disease. The pervasive threats in developing countries are bacteria and organisms that are commonly found in human or animal waste, which can contaminate water supplies when waste disposal areas are too close to drinking water sources. People who have ingested water contaminated with harmful organisms usually experience nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, dehydration – and in extreme cases, or in the very young – death.

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Constructive Healing Through Soothing Environments

Studies show that gardens — both in and outside medical facilities — soothe patients. It isn’t much of a leap to see that gardens with walkways, benches and the gentle hum of falling water would have similar effects in other public facilities. However, medical research also shows that water features, especially indoors, must be properly constructed and maintained or they may cause infectious illnesses. This need for safety has inspired innovation by design service companies like Orlando, FL-based BluWorld, a supplier of indoor landscaping…

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Well Water Contamination And Safe Drinking Conditions

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, more than 15 million U.S. households regularly depend on private ground water wells. Although this water can be safe for the most part, minor maintenance neglect can result in major problems. If even just a small amount of polluted ground water is consumed, it could lead to illness and other health complications. Seepage is the number one cause of groundwater pollution and can come from a number of different sources. These sources…

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The Forgotten Aftermath Of Natural Disaster: Cleaning Up

Hurricane Sandy came ashore late in the day on Monday, October 28, 2012. It is a date New York and New Jersey residents won’t soon forget. The storm wiped out houses and pushed sand and water four blocks inland in some places. While many had evacuated, many others were left stranded. About 10,000 Air National Guard and Army forces came on duty round the clock in the 13 states that were affected by the massive hurricane. The nation tends to rally…

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New Technology Could Revive Oceanic Dead Zones

In areas of oceans and lakes where aquatic life once thrived, scientists are now finding “dead zones” – low-oxygen areas choked with algal blooms. Most of the world eats fish a dietary staple. As dead zones grow larger, the demand for fish will increase and the supply available to those who need it most will diminish more and more over time. Fish raised in laboratory-created low oxygen conditions showed extremely low sex hormone and were less likely to reproduce, or…

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Changing Temperatures Beginning To Affect Fresh Water Ecosystems

Everybody loves to visit the lake in the summer. Boating, tubing and water skiing are staple warm weather activities for lake communities and vacationers. This past summer was one of the hottest on record, and many people saw their dreams of fun summers on the lake dashed as low water levels and blistering heat made the shore much less appealing. The truth is, climate change is a real phenomenon that will eventually affect the quality of human lives in very…

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Beijing Makes Changes To Fight Air Pollution

Beijing makes changes to fight air pollution For decades, air pollution has threatened the health of people in Beijing. Brown smog hangs over the city. The sun, when you can see it, is tinged a rusty brown, like looking at a flashlight through a piece of paper. City-dwellers wear surgical masks to protect their lungs from the pollutants and other chemicals that float in the air they breathe every day. But the people of Beijing have had enough. Under pressure…

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Scientists Discover Efficient Way To Absorb Oil Spills

Two years after the Deepwater Horizon oil platform exploded in the Gulf of Mexico, restoration efforts are still under way. At the time of the accident, scientists struggled with how to contain oil in the gulf, which killed animal and plant life and took a terrible toll on many industries. Now, we may be better prepared to respond to such a disaster, thanks to a groundbreaking new material. The details behind the innovation Scientist have invented a new super-absorbent material that can…

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Cooling Coal Emissions Has Massive Potential For Clean Air

Perhaps the largest concern on the part of the public is the potential cost of cooling coal emissions. But proponents of this technology say costs would be offset by a decline in health problems associated with coal production. Scientists estimate that poor air quality derived from burning coal costs the health care system somewhere between $330 billion and $500 billion every year. And that’s only taking the financial cost into account.

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The Power of the Pitcher: A Smart Choice for Clean Water, Green Living

There are many places where a healthy lifestyle and an eco-friendly lifestyle intersect, but who knew one of them was at a pitcher of tap water in your fridge? Though many health enthusiasts are rarely without their favorite bottled water, a 4-year study by the Natural Resources Defense Council concluded that bottled water isn’t necessarily any cleaner or safer than the free water that comes from our taps. In fact, some bottled water is nothing but tap water in fancy packaging.…

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EPA moves forward with Renewable Fuel Standard Waiver Requests, BIO takes a stand

The worst drought to hit parts of the U.S. in more than 50 years has some politicians and farmers scrambling to find ways of conserving food as crops shortages hit new highs. The U.S. Department of Agriculture projects a 17 percent reduction in corn crops this year, and the shortage has sent the price of corn bushels soaring. This has resulted in an increase in the cost of meat, as it is used to feed cattle and chicken. Some members…

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Natural Gas: A Step In The Right Direction

This post by Grady Winston addresses critical energy fuel and energy issues we all need to think about as a population that’s addicted to fossil fuels. I have no doubt some renewable enthusiasts will challenge Winston’s argument for using natural gas as opposed to oil or coal, saying it’s not nearly enough and it’s still a fossil fuel. But its cleaner combustion can’t be — and shouldn’t be — overlooked, especially as we see increasing evidence on the damaging effects of global…

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The Green Mountain State Just Got a Little Greener with Eagle Creek’s New Hydroelectric Facilities

Putting the “green” back in the Green Mountain State, Vermont’s Eagle Creek Renewable Energy, LLC recently acquired the development rights for two hydroelectric facilities from Blue Heron Hydro, LLC. This acquisition marks the first pure development project for Eagle Creek, and is scheduled to be built on Army Corps of Engineers dams in southern Vermont. Although the project represents a major step for the company in terms of fostering growth and opportunity, it also indicates the advancement of environmentally friendly…

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GE Releases The Most Efficient Water Filter Ever

Water is a basic need for humans, yet the current supply of drinking water is tainted with dangerous contaminants, including prescription and over the counter drugs. In fact, many would argue that the American water supply isn’t safe at all, even according the government’s somewhat loose standards. In a 2010 study, 10 percent of all water systems in the U.S. produced water that broke at least one EPA standard. This means that 23 million people in America had no choice…

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Going Green in the U.S.: Three Groundbreaking Eco-Friendly Buildings

As people become more concerned about the state of the environment, all industries are making efforts to go green. Though progress has been made across the board, architecture is an industry that has enjoyed significant success. All over the world, cities are building eco-friendly structures and renovating their existing buildings in order to lessen the strain on the environment. To design a green structure, architects rely on the rating system developed by the United States Green Building Council, which is…

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