Methanol Policy Forum Scheduled March 27, Washington D.C.

With interest in alternative fuels increasing on a worldwide level, a conference about the alternative fuel methanol – the Methanol Policy Forum 2012 – is scheduled Tuesday, March 27 in Washington, D.C.

Conference organizers describe the event as follows:

Methanol Policy Forum 2012 is a first-of-its-kind conference in Washington, D.C. bringing together industry leaders, energy policy experts, executive branch staff, Members of Congress, academics and the media to share information about methanol’s potential as a liquid transportation fuel.

The conference will highlight: market trends and pricing; the potential of natural gas, coal, renewable, and other resources to serve as methanol feedstocks; global vehicle technology and methanol fuel deployment; and public policy drivers.

With the renewed interest in methanol fuels in our nation’s capital, through this discussion, we seek to identify barriers to market penetration and policies that would serve to enhance fuel competition.

Remembering the termination in 2005 of the innovative two-decade-long California program that mixed 85 percent of the alternative fuel methanol with 15 percent of the fossil fuel gasoline to fill the tanks of flexible fuel vehicles (FFVs) and reduce greenhouse gases, events such as this might spur interest among decision-making authorities to see more taking in the way of renewable alternative fuels.

 


About the Author

Writer, documentary producer, and director. Meyers is a contributor to CleanTechnica, and founder of Green Streets MediaTrain, a communications connection and eLearning hub. As an independent producer, he's been involved in the development, production and distribution of television and distance learning programs for both the education industry and corporate sector. He also is an avid gardener and loves sustainable innovation.
  • Hi Glenn,
    Thanks for posting about this event. So you know (and have covered in previous stories) methanol is not a biogas. Though it is naturally occuring and biodegradable, methanol is made from a number of different feedstocks including natural gas, biomass, municipal solid waste, and even from CO2 pollution itself (Carbon Recycling International). If you have any quiestions, or want to do some real coverage about what is going on with methanol, feel free to take a look at our website (www.methanol.org) and get in touch with me.

    Best,

    Matt

  • Thanks, for the contact, Matt. I removed the biogas reference!