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Published on March 14th, 2012 | by Glenn Meyers

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U.S. Navy Test Successful on Algal Derived Renewable Diesel Fuel

Solazyme’s renewable marine fuel powers naval fleet ship and outboard engines

The era of renewable biofuels is getting much closer to reality, following a successful test run for a diesel frigate traveling from Everett, WA to San Diego, CA.

The biodiesel test was managed by Solazyme, Inc., a renewable oil and bioproducts company. It announced today that the USS Ford, a U.S. Navy Frigate fleet ship, successfully journeyed from its homeport in Everett, WA to San Diego, CA using Soladiesel HRD-76, Solazyme’s 100 percent algal derived renewable marine diesel fuel. The voyage required 25,000 gallons of a 50/50 blend using Soladiesel and petroleum F-76 in the ship’s LM 2500 diesel turbines. This marks the first demonstration of the alternative fuel blend in an operational fleet ship.

Meeting the secretary of the Navy’s call for a drop-in fuel replacement, no changes were required to the infrastructure of the ship or fueling pier for the test. Feedback from the ship’s engineers was favorable; the crew reported that operational performance of the fuel system and gas turbine engines on the 50/50 blend was similar comparable to operations on traditional petroleum F-76.

This You Tube video reports on the fuel mixture.

“The U.S. Navy continues to demonstrate the effectiveness of our fuel in multiple vessels, and we are honored to have the opportunity to assist with efforts to reduce their dependence on fossil fuels,” said Rogerio Manso, Solazyme chief commercialization officer in a press announcement. “We view these successful tests as an important step towards the commercialization of our renewable fuels.”

Last December, U.S. Navy Secretary Ray Mabus announced plans to spend $12 million to buy 450,000 gallons of alternative fuel for aircraft, ships and unmanned vehicles, the biggest government purchase of advanced biofuels. This marked the single largest purchase of advanced biofuel in government history.

Solazyme’s renewable diesel and jet fuels meet all of the EU, ASTM and draft military specifications for diesel, marine diesel and jet biofuels.

The company’s renewable products can replace or enhance oils derived from the world’s three existing sources – petroleum, plants and animal fats. Initially, Solazyme is focused on commercializing its products into three target markets:  fuels and chemicals, nutrition, skin and personal care.

Photo: Solazyme


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About the Author

Writer, documentary producer, and director. Meyers is a contributor to CleanTechnica, and founder of Green Streets MediaTrain, a communications connection and eLearning hub. As an independent producer, he's been involved in the development, production and distribution of television and distance learning programs for both the education industry and corporate sector. He also is an avid gardener and loves sustainable innovation.



  • anonymous

    DOE BIOMASS PROGRAM AND ALGAE RESEARCHERS NEED TO BE INVESTIGATED!

    Solydra story is opening a huge can of worms at the DOE LOAN GURANTEE LOAN PROGRAM. Its not just about the Solar loan guarantee program. Look at all the millions in fees collected by the DOE LOAN GUARANTEE PROGRAM with algae projects less than 20% completed. An audit is being done on all DOE GRANTS to algae researchers and ndividuals from the DOE that are now working in private industry. Very incestuous!

    The US taxpayer has spent over $2.5 billion dollars over the last 50 years on algae research. To date, nothing has been commercialized by any algae researcher.

    The REAL question is: Does the DOE BIOMASS PROGRAM really want the US off of foreign oil or do they want to continue funding more grants for algae research to keep algae researchers employed at universities for another 50 years?

    In business, you are not given 50 years to research anything. The problem is in the Congressional Mandate that says the DOE can only use taxpayer monies on algae research, NOT algae production in the US. So far, algae research has not got the US off of foreign oil for the last 50 years!

    A Concerned Taxpayer

    ARPA-E halts algae project, citing missed milestones
    Jim Lane | February 16, 2012
    Share”In Washington, the DOE has halted a research project at Iowa State University funded by ARPA-E to develop biofuel feedstock from an aquatic micro-organism for failing to reach research milestones. About 56% of the $4.4 million grant was used. Politicians against increasing APRA-E funding as proposed by President Obama’s new budget are using it and other halted ARPA-E projects as examples to reject the program.”

  • Pingback: The future is here, despite some US GOP politicians’ ignorance about the GOP’s positive contributions to biofuels space «()

  • Pingback: US Navy Test Successful on Algal Derived Renewable Diesel Fuel – Green Building Elements | Algae Biodiesel()

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