Here’s Looking at Green Fireplaces

March 4, 2011

Those looking for sustainable heating alternatives might wish to look at the clean-burning line of Tulikivi soapstone masonry heaters that use wood for fuel.

The Finnish company claims to have over a quarter of a million contented Tulikivi fireplace business and homeowners worldwide. Some public buildings in this country that heat with a Tulikivi have been recognized with LEED awards.

According to the Tulikivi company, the Tulikivi soapstone masonry heater provides clean combustion that boasts emissions levels below regulations. The radiant heat provided by a Tulikivi is more energy-efficient than the convection heat of a traditional wood burner.

Heating air with radiant heat from aTulikivi heaterprovides fresh and comfortable warmth, not the burned and dry heat produced by convection heat in traditional wood burners. The patented Tulikivi heating methodology has been recognized by Finland’s Asthma and Allergy Association because of the constant radiant heat it provides, preventing the generation of humidity (an instigator of mold).

The Tulikivi Whirlbox – a new invention – lengthens the time combustion gases remain in the fire chamber, allowing combustion to be efficient, but it is also exceptionally clean.

Soapstone is a dense, heat-resistant and solid material and has better heat retaining and thermal conductivity properties than other stones. A short 1 – 3 hour burn cycle per day will contribute a significant amount of heat.

“In the Whirlbox, combustion gases and air are mixed very effectively in the chamber which improves efficiency and provides a non-wasteful and exceptionally clean burn,” said Juha Sivonen, Tulikivi director of sales, “The emissions from a Tulikivi fireplace are reduced to only a fraction of even the world’s strictest emission standards, and thanks to its simple structure, the Whirlbox is also a very reliable and easy to use firebox.”

Unfortunately, Tulikivi pricing is significant, running between $8,800 and $12,720 for these models. Even so, Tulikivi emissions are well below some of the strictest state standards including Washington and Colorado.

Tulikivi, headquartered in Juuka, Finland, is the world’s largest manufacturer of heat-retaining fireplaces, exporting over half of its output to Europe and North America. The company’s complete range of fireplaces, consisting of more than 60 models, is considered among the cleanest wood-burning fireplaces in the world. Tulikivi has six production plants and employs over 500 people.


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Glenn Meyers

Writer, documentary producer, and director. Meyers is a contributor to CleanTechnica, and founder of Green Streets MediaTrain, a communications connection and eLearning hub. As an independent producer, he's been involved in the development, production and distribution of television and distance learning programs for both the education industry and corporate sector. He also is an avid gardener and loves sustainable innovation.
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