Commercial Buildings

Published on August 15th, 2016 | by Dawn Killough

5

SolarWindow Window Coating – Versatile Solar Power Generation

August 15th, 2016 by  


SolarWindow window coating generates electricity on glass, plastic, and paper

Peering through see-through SolarWindow™ that generates electricity on glass, plastic, and even paper

SolarWindow™ window coating generates electricity from light, both from the sun, and artificial light, as well. It is extremely versatile, able to be printed onto glass, plastic, or even paper, making it easy to install this wonder material in many places.

This coating sets itself apart from others we have featured, as it can be applied on a wider range of surfaces, and the power production can actually be tuned to the specific needs of the building.

SolarWindow window coating President, John A. Conklin

John A. Conklin, President and CEO of SolarWindow Technologies

John A. Conklin, President and CEO of SolarWindow Technologies, says “As a transparent electricity-generating coating, SolarWindow™ coatings being applied to the vast acres of window glass in tall towers and skyscrapers could provide a valid source of renewable electricity and offset a building’s energy needs.”

Since the product is not wholly dependent on sun exposure, it can be installed in areas that receive little natural light and still provide electricity, decreasing its payback period. “When SolarWindow™ is modeled for a 50-story building, results show the industry’s fastest published financial payback of less than one year, more than 50 times the energy and more than 15 times the environmental benefit can be generated as validated by a team of independent engineers and scientists.”

Many large commercial buildings have limited rooftop space and can’t accommodate a large solar panel array. With the SolarWindow™ system, the entire vertical surface of the building, on all four sides, is able to be used to generate electricity and help buildings achieve net zero energy.

“The benefit of SolarWindow™ installed on the vast acres of glass on tall towers and skyscrapers around the world could offset equivalent carbon dioxide, helping to manage global warming and contribute to reducing air emission pollutants that are harmful to human health,” says Conklin.

Dr Scott Hammond, scientist, works on SolarWindow window coating

Dr. Scott Hammond, principal scientist, works on SolarWindow™ development

The coating is made of organic materials and comes in a variety of architecturally appealing colors, including clear. The film is light weight and is easily applied using screen printing, ink-jet printing, or spraying, which makes it attractive to manufacturers wanting to include the coating on their window products.

With electricity use in commercial buildings only increasing, glass with solar-power-generating capabilities can help lower energy demand and save building owners massive quantities of money. SolarWindow™ technology can be used with new construction projects, as well as remodels and retrofits.

Photos: SolarWindow Technologies

 


Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,


About the Author

has over 15 years experience in the construction industry and is the author of Green Building Design 101, an e-book available from Amazon. She is a LEED AP and Certified Green Building Advisor, and has worked on the LEED Certification of three projects in Salem, Oregon. She is currently a Contract Administrator at Rich Duncan Construction.  



Back to Top ↑
  • Advertisement

  • Green Building News (Free)

  • Advertisement

  • Other IM Network Sites

  • Advertisement

  • Go Solar

    Go solar to both cut your footprint and massively cut your bills! Check out the current cost of solar panels (after a big cost drop), or just head over to Cost of Solar to get your free report showing how much money solar can save you... and the planet!
  • Search the IM Network

  • The content produced by this site is for entertainment purposes only. Opinions and comments published on this site may not be sanctioned by, and do not necessarily represent the views of Sustainable Enterprises Media, Inc., its owners, sponsors, affiliates, or subsidiaries.


Shares