Energy

Published on February 26th, 2011 | by Jennifer Shockley

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Miranda Homes is a Company That Leads the Way of Sustainable Construction

February 26th, 2011 by  


Home owners and home builders are looking for new technologies to simplify construction and to improve the impact that the home has on the environment.  Rob Boydstun changed his metal works company that built car carriers into a company that’s leading the way in recycled, prefabricated homes called Miranda Homes. 

Many attributes contribute to the fact that these homes are more sustainable than traditional wood-framed houses.  Some of the contributing factors are that the foundation is poured in one day, thus eliminating waste and shortening the time it can be completed, also that the walls are built in a controlled-plant environment not on-site, then shipped to the site and assembled in one day, lessening travel and construction time, plus energy wasted in transport and materials.  These homes can be built in 45-60 days from ground breaking and require one-third less labor than wood-framed homes.

The wall panel systems are 100% recycled steel from junked cars.  Miranda Homes uses both rigid and blown-in foam insulation, thus reducing air-transfer that is typical with steel structures.  This insulation combination also controls passive vents and heat loss by piping.

Other bonuses to the prefabricated recycled steel walls are:

  • Pest/Moisture resistant
  • Outlasts traditional materials
  • Affordable
  • Technologically advanced

Mark Mecklem, Vice President of Sales and Marketing for Miranda Homes states,

“Miranda Homes is always researching new products to see how they fit into our building principles and methods. We’re looking for products that improve safety for our people, reduce impact on the environment, and increase the quality, monthly savings, and longevity of our homes for the homeowners.”

They have currently seven different home designs to choose from and have partnered with Landwaves, Inc. to build a housing community in Oregon.  “Modern House Magazine” wrote of Boydstun’s company’s engineering progress,

“In the end, it’s not the style that makes these houses “modern,” rather the efficiency.”

Efficiency as a home builder is just as important as efficiency for the home owner.  Miranda Homes knows how important this is and is changing the construction industry by changing their ways making more sustainable options available to the public.

Sources: Miranda HomesOregon Live, Modern  House Magazine, Earth Advantage

Photo Source: Green Diary

HEROES WELCOMING HEROES EVENT TO PROVIDE WELCOME HOME FEAST IN JULY

US Fed News Service, Including US State News June 29, 2007 The U.S. Air Force Aeronautical Systems Center issued the following press release:

The next Heroes Welcoming Heroes event for military members returning from deployment and their families is planned for 6-8 p.m. July 11 at the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force.

Heroes Welcoming Heroes is hosted by Wright-Patterson’s Integrated Delivery System — 13 base agencies that form a team to provide help to active duty military, family members, Department of Defense civilians, and retirees, said Jennifer Spurgin, the chief of base family member programs.

The IDS agencies include alcohol and drug abuse prevention and treatment program, American Red Cross, Airman and family readiness center, chaplain services, employee assistance program, family advocacy program, family member program, health and wellness center, mental health, military equal opportunity, organizational consulting office, sexual assault response coordinator office and victim witness assistance program. this web site free restaurant coupons

The upcoming Heroes Welcoming Heroes event will be the sixth one in a series that began in 2005.

Some of the “heroes” are the troops returning home, Ms. Spurgin said. The other ‘Heroes” are the families who support them.

“We’ve had more that 2,000 people participate so far,” she said. “We have a ‘buy-in’ by the community, and the spouses are so critical for our success.” Besides the heroes, veterans’ associations, the Air Force Association, base leaders, community and base organizations have all supported the welcoming event.

“It’s a family-friendly evening of food, fun, door prizes and education,” she said. “This event in July will have clowns making balloon figures and music from the Air Force Band of Flight.

“Also, base leadership at all levels and local community and government representatives plan to attend. An emcee will talk to families and to children, asking them, ‘What’s best about having mommy or daddy home again?'” The IDS sends invitations to affected families connected to all base organizations, and company grade officer volunteers follow up with telephone calls to ensure that all heroes receive word about the banquet,” Ms. Spurgin said.

Anyone interested in attending should reply to his or her first sergeant. here free restaurant coupons

“The CGOs also help with the set-up and tear down at the banquet,” she added. “Up to a dozen representatives from the base, community and spouse points of contact plan the event, beginning nearly two months ahead. “This is a labor of love. People work so hard and are so … committed to this.” Through a partnership of community businesses and agencies and base agencies, the Heroes Welcoming Heroes banquet will feature door prizes of luggage, TVs, quilts, gift packages for newborns, restaurant coupons, tickets to Dayton Bombers and Dayton Dragons games and more.

“Other bases have contacted me to find out what we’re doing here,” Ms. Spurgin said. “The planning is streamlined now, but other bases don’t do what we’re doing, and they want to learn from us.” She said that the Heroes Welcoming Heroes banquets are coordinated with the air expeditionary force cycle.

Anyone interested in more information about the Heroes Welcoming Heroes banquet should contact his or her first sergeant.


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About the Author

Jennifer is originally from Colorado and has recently moved back from Michigan. She is finishing up her Master’s degree in Architecture. She is currently focusing on urban planning and sustainable design and hopes to gain employment at a design firm specializing in these areas. Jennifer also has writing experience serving as an editor for her school newspaper and college magazine. Jennifer has two cats named Prada and Dior-aptly named after her shoe obsession. You can follow Jennifer on twitter @jenshock81.



  • Ashley Wilkes

    It’s great how Miranda Housing is innovating the wall construction and materials paradigm in the many ways stated in the article. However, like so many other sustainable building innovators, they don’t think out of the box. We’ll never get to the point where we should be in dwelling and commercial building construction until we do away with the The Box Paradigm. Energy and construction-time-efficient as Miranda Homes may be, box structures are vulnerable to high winds, tornadoes, hurricanes, earthquakes, ergo, Mother Nature’s frequent human-unfriendly behavior. I believe the monolithic dome should be the basic core paradigm of most construction. When built with innovation and common sense, the monolithic dome paradigm is the most resistant to extreme/destructive natural events. I’ve been working and brainstorming to design a monolithic dome structure to deal with the
    few valid drawbacks present, but far from impossible to resolve, in its design. I’m working toward what I believe will be raise the dwelling construction bar for energy efficiency, sustainability, low construction cost, ease of construction, disaster resistance, ease of maintenance and related costs, aesthetic profile, and durability. Perhaps GBE will be the first to publish the article in which I will detail my final design.

  • I am glad to see this method being developed. As for the Box Paradigm, I think that it will be difficult to convince homeowners to change their attitudes. How many homes still are around based on Buckminster-Fuller’s Dymaxon design or his sphere? I would like to see builders incorporating curves at the corners though. The box design places too much stress on the foundation at these points. BY distributing the weight through a rounded corner design, we create a better method for handling the weight of the home on the foundation.

  • Ashley Wilkes

    “I think that it will be difficult to convince homeowners to change their attitudes. How many homes still are around based on Buckminster-Fuller’s Dymaxon design or his sphere?” With that kind of rationale there would not much going on to fruition innovative and inspiring Green Building. Your question about Bucky Fuller-designed structures is a rhetorical one. Fuller mentored me and others in several workhops he created to teach the concepts behind domebuilding, best strategies for erecting them, materials to use. To wit, It certainly makes good sense to “round out” the style of vehicles for smoother driving and better mileage but that does’t change the basic paradigm of the car’s propulsion system which should be entirely electric, hydrogen, or biofuel made from switch grass. A dwelling wall that is on vertical and 10 to 20
    ft in height, will act like a sail if hit broadside by straight line winds of
    over 120 mph. I wouldn’t want to wager that Miranda built walls would not be damage such scenarios.

    I never claimed that it would be easy to change the attitudes of the masses. That’s just a challenge to me and I see that as a reason not to abandon my efforts. By the F. Buck Fuller was not the first to come with the dome concept. He refined it and he made it popular.

    The Zeiss I planetarium in Jena, conceived and constructed by Walther Baursfeld in 1923 is considered the first geodesic dome derived from the icosahedron, more than 20 years before Buckminster Fuller reinvented and popularized this design.

    A “monolithic ” dome is not really a dome from a Fuller perspective.
    I’m referring to the monolithic dome – not a Fuller-based geodesic structure. There are huge differences despite the obvious similar roundness.

  • J-Rock

    EcoSteel offer a slightly different approach to prefab construction. Rather than using foam insulated in between wall supports we use pre-insulated steel wall and roof panels. This speeds production even faster as the exterior of wall panel acts as the facade of the house. You can find out more detail about us and our eco-friendly way of home construction. http://www.ecosteel.com

  • Thanks for the blog loaded with a lot of information.

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