Materials aerogel

Published on April 11th, 2008 | by Philip Proefrock

48

Aerogel Insulation Advances

aerogel[social_buttons] Aerogel is almost a product out of science fiction.

Nicknamed “frozen smoke,” aerogel is extremely lightweight material, with a density only 3 times that of air. Only a small fraction of a volume of aerogel is the material itself. Most of the volume is filled with air. This makes aerogel an excellent insulator. (Aerogel provides nearly 40 times the insulation of fiberglass insulation.)

Aerogel can withstand great pressures and is also an excellent sound insulator. Aerogels can also be used to absorb airborne pollutants and have been used to clean up oil spills. NASA also used a section of aerogel as part of its Stardust probe to collect samples of material from the tail of a comet.

Aerogel is available for some high-performance applications, but due to its high cost, it has not been widely used. However, new research from a Malaysian scientist offers the potential to drastically reduce the cost of producing aerogel, and could lead to new possibilities for its use as a building and insulation material.

Dr. Halimaton Hamdan from the Universiti Teknologi in Malaysia has developed a method of producing aerogel that could reduce the cost of producing aerogel by 80% by using agricultural waste from rice husks as the feedstock. Rice husks evidently have a high silica content, and silica is the main constituent of aerogel. In addition to potentially being able to produce aerogel for one-fifth the current cost, this also addresses a problem with disposing of rice husk waste.

Because aerogel is translucent, rather than completely transparent, one of the places it has first been used in architectural applications has been in daylighting panels. Commercial applications of aerogel are from companies such as Kalwall and Advanced Glazings, both of which produce diffuse lighting windows that incorporate aerogel to produce panels that transmit light while having an insulation R-value equal or better than that in an insulated wall in a new home. These windows aren’t for vision, but they allow a high percentage of light to be transmitted, allowing for diffused daylighting, which is a better method for lighting without producing unnecessary glare. However, until now, these windows have been used only in special instances because of their high cost.

If prices for aerogel become significantly lower, it should be possible to see highly insulating panels that can replace traditional forms of insulation. Even more compelling is the possibility for retrofitting existing buildings with relatively thin panels that can significantly improve their thermal performance. Since buildings last for such a long period of time, retrofit solutions are going to become an important part of reducing the amount of energy used by buildings without needing to demolish and replace everything that has already been built.

Links:
Green Building Elements: Super Insulating Vacuum Glass

Green Building Elements: Better Daylighting

NASA: Aerogel fact sheet

Image Source: NASA via Wikipedia

via: EcoGeek

Electronic Arts Releases Fiscal 1Q 2012 Financial Results.

Health & Beauty Close-Up July 31, 2011 Electronic Arts Inc. has announced preliminary financial results for its first fiscal quarter ended June 30.

“This was another solid quarter driven by both digital and packaged goods,” said John Riccitiello, CEO. “We saw strong digital revenue growth over the prior year. On packaged goods, NCAA is off to a great start and pre-orders for Battlefield 3 are tracking extremely well.” “EA is well positioned for the year ahead and reaffirms its fiscal 2012 non-GAAP EPS guidance,” said Eric Brown, CFO. “And we are increasing non-GAAP digital revenue guidance to a range of $1.100 billion to $1.150 billion for fiscal 2012.” In a release on July 26, the Company noted Selected Operating Highlights and Metrics:

-Trailing twelve month non-GAAP digital revenue $854 million, up 35 percent year-over-year.

-First quarter fiscal 2012 non-GAAP digital revenue $209 million, up 11 percent year-over-year.

-Trailing twelve month console non-GAAP digital revenue increased 91 percent year-over-year.

-First quarter fiscal 2012 smart phone non-GAAP revenue up over 75 percent year-over-year.

-Nucleus registered users 125 million at the end of first quarter fiscal 2012.

-EA held five of the top ten paid games on Verizon, two of the top ten paid games on the iPhone, and two of the top ten paid games on the iPad in June 2011.

-Portal 2 sold in over two million units in the first quarter. On catalogue, Crysis 2 sold in approximately three million units life to date; Dead Space 2 and Dragon Age 2 have both sold in over two million units life to date.

-EA was the #1 publisher in Western markets with 16 percent segment share in the June quarter.

-For the quarter, EA had four of the top 20 selling games in Western markets: Portal 2, Crysis 2, FIFA 11, and Tiger Woods PGA TOUR 12: The Masters.

-Life to date, including digital and mobile downloads, FIFA 11 sold in nearly 15 million units and Battlefield: Bad Company 2 sold in over nine million units, demonstrating strong cross-platform results -EA Games Label and EA Sports garnered 148 award nominations and 19 wins at E3. Winners included Mass Effect 3, Battlefield 3, STAR WARS: The Old Republic, FIFA 12, SSX, Need for Speed The Run, Kingdoms of Amalur: Reckoning, Madden NFL 12, and NHL 12. in our site dragon age 2 characters

-EA’s E3 Game Changers press conference was viewed by more than two million people on Spike TV’s broadcast and live webcasts on several consumer sites.

-On July 12, EA announced an agreement to acquire PopCap Games, a supplier of games for mobile phones, tablets, PCs and social network sites. With blockbuster titles like Plants vs. Zombies, Bejeweled, and Zuma, and a proven ability to create new hits, PopCap is a leader in the fast growing market for casual digital games. The acquisition is expected to be completed in August 2011. The PopCap acquisition is expected to be neutral to fiscal 2012 non-GAAP and GAAP EPS, at least $0.10 accretive to fiscal 2013 non-GAAP EPS and $0.10 dilutive to fiscal 2013 GAAP EPS. website dragon age 2 characters

Q1 FY12 Financial Highlights:

Non-GAAP net revenue of $524 million was at the upper end of our updated guidance of $500 million to $525 million. Non-GAAP loss per share of ($0.37) also was at the upper end of our guidance of ($0.40) to ($0.37). As expected, non-GAAP net revenue in Q1 fiscal 2012 was lower as compared to Q1 fiscal 2011 due to a reduced title slate, which went from six major titles in Q1 fiscal 2011 to four in Q1 fiscal 2012. This was somewhat offset by our continued digital revenue growth.

Second Quarter Fiscal Year 2012 Expectations – Ending September 30 -GAAP net revenue is expected to be approximately $675 to $725 million.

-Non-GAAP net revenue is expected to be approximately $925 to $975 million.

-GAAP diluted loss per share is expected to be approximately ($1.03) to ($0.87) as compared to previous guidance of ($1.10) to ($0.97).

-Non-GAAP diluted loss per share is expected to be approximately ($0.13) to ($0.03) as compared to previous guidance of ($0.15) to ($0.05).

-For purposes of calculating second quarter fiscal year 2011 loss per share, the Company estimates a share count of 331 million.

-Expected non-GAAP net loss excludes the following from expected GAAP net loss:

-Non-GAAP net revenue is expected to be approximately $250 million higher than GAAP net revenue due to the impact of the change in deferred net revenue (packaged goods and digital content);

-Approximately $50 million of estimated stock-based compensation;

-Approximately $25 to 30 million of acquisition-related expenses;

-Approximately $5 million of restructuring charges;

-Approximately $5 million from the amortization of debt discount; and -Non-GAAP tax expense is expected to be $43 to $56 million higher than GAAP tax expense.

Fiscal Year 2012 Expectations – Ending March 31, 2012 -GAAP net revenue is expected to be approximately $3.825 billion to $4.025 billion as compared to our previous guidance of $3.725 billion to $3.950 billion.

-Non-GAAP net revenue is expected to be approximately $3.900 billion to $4.100 billion as compared to our previous guidance of $3.800 to $4.025 billion.

-GAAP diluted earnings (loss) per share is expected to be approximately a loss per share of ($0.10) to earnings per share of $0.21, as compared to previous guidance of ($0.04) to $0.26.

-Non-GAAP diluted earnings per share are expected to be approximately $0.70 to $0.90.

-For purposes of calculating fiscal year 2012 earnings (loss) per share, the Company estimates a share count of 330 million for loss per share computations and 334 million for earnings per share computations.

-Expected non-GAAP net income excludes the following items from expected GAAP net income (loss):

-Non-GAAP net revenue is expected to be approximately $75 million higher than GAAP revenue due to the impact of the change in deferred net revenue (packaged goods and digital content);

-Approximately $175 million of estimated stock-based compensation;

-Approximately $85 to $95 million of acquisition-related expenses;

-Approximately $28 million of restructuring charges;

-Approximately $15 million from the amortization of debt discount; and -Non-GAAP tax expense is expected to be $121 to $147 million higher than GAAP tax expense.

Electronic Arts is a global supplier in digital interactive entertainment. The Company’s game franchises are offered as both packaged goods products and online services delivered through Internet-connected consoles, personal computers, mobile phones and tablets.

More Information:

info.ea.com ((Comments on this story may be sent to health@closeupmedia.com))




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About the Author

Philip Proefrock is an architect and photographer in southeast Michigan. He is also a LEED Acredited Professional. His professional involvement with green building includes working as project architect for the award-winning Malletts Creek Branch Library for the Ann Arbor District Library, which received the 2005 AIA Michigan Sustainable Design Award, and which was the first completed commercial vegetated roof (green roof) in the state of Michigan. He is an active member of Green Drinks Michigan/o2 Network. In addition to being lead writer for Green Building Elements, he is also a contributing writer for EcoGeek.org and for JetsonGreen.com. spurious nelogism (personal LiveJournal) Green Options articles StumbleUpon profile



48 Responses to Aerogel Insulation Advances

  1. If you looked at a 1/8″ thick aerogel panel in a standard 4′ x 8′size, it would weigh 28.3 grams (about the weight of 10 pennies) and, at almost 40x the insulation value of fiberglass, would be roughly equivalent in insulation value to a well insulated 2×4 stud wall.

  2. If you looked at a 1/8″ thick aerogel panel in a standard 4′ x 8′size, it would weigh 28.3 grams (about the weight of 10 pennies) and, at almost 40x the insulation value of fiberglass, would be roughly equivalent in insulation value to a well insulated 2×4 stud wall.

  3. spuffler says:

    And can anyone purchase these 4 x 8 sheets of Aerogel? No?

    Well, then, keep dreaming. When it arrives at Home Depot, and can be delivered there without damage, then we can talk about a practical product.

    “Talk about it, talk about it, talk about it, talk about it…. Won’t you take me to…. FunkyTown?”

  4. spuffler says:

    And can anyone purchase these 4 x 8 sheets of Aerogel? No?

    Well, then, keep dreaming. When it arrives at Home Depot, and can be delivered there without damage, then we can talk about a practical product.

    “Talk about it, talk about it, talk about it, talk about it…. Won’t you take me to…. FunkyTown?”

  5. Chuck Orr says:

    Wow. Now large skylights made with aerogel panels could provide light without the downside of sound and thermal transmission. When will they be available?

  6. Chuck Orr says:

    Wow. Now large skylights made with aerogel panels could provide light without the downside of sound and thermal transmission. When will they be available?

  7. kamic says:

    What makes the cost so high? cant we throw a bunch of funding into an assembly line of these?

  8. kamic says:

    What makes the cost so high? cant we throw a bunch of funding into an assembly line of these?

  9. I don’t know enough about the manufacture of aerogel to give you a complete answer. Part of the cost is in the refinement of silica. Since rice husks have a high silica content (20%, I believe) they make a good supply feedstock, and this is at the root of the new production method.

    @Chuck Orr – as I mentioned, manufacturers including Kalwall and Advanced Glazings are presently making windows and panels with aerogel. But they are very expensive.

  10. I don’t know enough about the manufacture of aerogel to give you a complete answer. Part of the cost is in the refinement of silica. Since rice husks have a high silica content (20%, I believe) they make a good supply feedstock, and this is at the root of the new production method.

    @Chuck Orr – as I mentioned, manufacturers including Kalwall and Advanced Glazings are presently making windows and panels with aerogel. But they are very expensive.

  11. Uncle B says:

    There are many sources of silica, straw being one of them. Some entrepreneurial Chinese boys will pick this up and be selling us Made in China insulation before we Americans can get up to eat lunch. This will not be lost to mankind, only to our workshops because we don’t feel we have too anymore, we proved ourselves in the WWII era and now we’re done!

  12. Uncle B says:

    There are many sources of silica, straw being one of them. Some entrepreneurial Chinese boys will pick this up and be selling us Made in China insulation before we Americans can get up to eat lunch. This will not be lost to mankind, only to our workshops because we don’t feel we have too anymore, we proved ourselves in the WWII era and now we’re done!

  13. Eric says:

    Uncle B, you are right. Our dependance on the industrial age as made us prehistoric in the coming web v2.0 age. Our power is not limited by our potential, simply our lack of ability to be flexible. Our nation is led by large companies with no ability to do what the market calls for. Even if they were built to be that flexible, good luck having the administration with the Gonads to pull the trigger.

  14. Eric says:

    Uncle B, you are right. Our dependance on the industrial age as made us prehistoric in the coming web v2.0 age. Our power is not limited by our potential, simply our lack of ability to be flexible. Our nation is led by large companies with no ability to do what the market calls for. Even if they were built to be that flexible, good luck having the administration with the Gonads to pull the trigger.

  15. Mike says:

    Here is a page on how silica aerogels are made.

    http://eande.lbl.gov/ECS/aerogels/sa-making.html

    there seem to be several factors that severely limit aerogel manufacturing. One is that the time required to manufacture a piece is heavily dependent on its thickness, because many steps are slow diffusion processes. Another factor is that the pressures and temperatures involved are high and must be precisely controlled, thus require a special environment and a batch-type manufacturing process.

    Another consideration is that silica aerogels tend to flake and release micro-particles into the air. I’m not sure if these would be more dangerous than the micro-particles produced by fiberglass, but it is a potential safety concern. Aerogel also has a strong dessication effect, absorbing moisture strongly enough to cause “burns” on human skin after prolonged contact. This, along with aerogel’s fragility, would make installation a tricky process if you were to use large panels as insulation.

    Of course, granulated aerogel can be embedded into other materials to mitigate a lot of the logistical problems associated with it, but you also lose a significant portion its insulation potential (since pretty much everything is significantly more thermally conductive than aerogel). It depends on how much insulation you need, I guess, and how much space you have to put it in.

  16. Mike says:

    Here is a page on how silica aerogels are made.

    http://eande.lbl.gov/ECS/aerogels/sa-making.html

    there seem to be several factors that severely limit aerogel manufacturing. One is that the time required to manufacture a piece is heavily dependent on its thickness, because many steps are slow diffusion processes. Another factor is that the pressures and temperatures involved are high and must be precisely controlled, thus require a special environment and a batch-type manufacturing process.

    Another consideration is that silica aerogels tend to flake and release micro-particles into the air. I’m not sure if these would be more dangerous than the micro-particles produced by fiberglass, but it is a potential safety concern. Aerogel also has a strong dessication effect, absorbing moisture strongly enough to cause “burns” on human skin after prolonged contact. This, along with aerogel’s fragility, would make installation a tricky process if you were to use large panels as insulation.

    Of course, granulated aerogel can be embedded into other materials to mitigate a lot of the logistical problems associated with it, but you also lose a significant portion its insulation potential (since pretty much everything is significantly more thermally conductive than aerogel). It depends on how much insulation you need, I guess, and how much space you have to put it in.

  17. That’s a great link you provided, Mike. Thanks very much.

    As to an insulation product made using aerogel, I think it would be necessary for it to be completely encapsulated. It’s far too fragile to stand up to a direct loose-fill application (like fiberglass). It would have to be something like a board that incorporated an aerogel inside.

  18. That’s a great link you provided, Mike. Thanks very much.

    As to an insulation product made using aerogel, I think it would be necessary for it to be completely encapsulated. It’s far too fragile to stand up to a direct loose-fill application (like fiberglass). It would have to be something like a board that incorporated an aerogel inside.

  19. CARSON44 says:

    “Uncle B” is right, there is no longer any urgency left in the USA . Part of the reason I think is legal issues and regulation. The roadblocks to good ideas in our fair country make the majority of aspiring inventors and entrepreneurs run for cover when they first encountered these obstacles.

  20. CARSON44 says:

    “Uncle B” is right, there is no longer any urgency left in the USA . Part of the reason I think is legal issues and regulation. The roadblocks to good ideas in our fair country make the majority of aspiring inventors and entrepreneurs run for cover when they first encountered these obstacles.

  21. Bruce Keller says:

    FYI Advanced Glazings has closed down.

  22. Bruce Keller says:

    FYI Advanced Glazings has closed down.

  23. Jay Draiman, Energy Analyst says:

    ERV Energy Recovery Ventilation Systems Reduce Long Term Costs and Improve Indoor Air Quality

    Is the indoor air your breathe is as fresh and healthy as it can be?

    As building science professionals have known for some time, an effective ventilation strategy is an absolute requirement for all homes. Mechanical ventilators exchange air inside the home with fresh air from the outside. This helps to reduce indoor pollution levels, and greatly increases the comfort level inside the home.
    Many ventilation designs are including Energy Recovery Ventilators (ERVs) to improve the system efficiency. Besides providing controlled ventilation, ERVs are able to filter, humidify, dehumidify, heat, or cool the incoming fresh air. The most popular design of ERVs utilizes a desiccant wheel to remove both heat and a significant amount of moisture from the incoming air, which reduces the load on the air-conditioning system. But while ventilators and ERVs can add tremendously to the comfort and efficiency of a home, they must be installed correctly.

    One of the more recent developments in the ‘green’ technology industry is the creation of environmentally-friendly buildings that use energy-efficient technologies to reduce power consumption.

    Energy consultants point out that creating ‘green’ buildings and improving the air quality inside such facilities utilizing ERV can and do go hand-in-hand. ERV Systems that reduce demand for energy while improving ventilation are increasingly in demand.

    ERV – Energy Recovery Ventilation systems saves energy, increases indoor air quality, reduces contaminates and odors.

    The use of ERV technology “energy recovery ventilation systems,” or ERVs. Such systems are designed to reduce energy consumption and improve indoor air quality (IAQ) by capturing and recycling building energy to humidify, pre-cool or dehumidify incoming air.

    ERVs, the research first said, are most popular in areas with more extreme outdoor temperatures, like Northern states where winters can get quite cold, or Southern states where very warm temperatures and high humidity demand more energy consumption to maintain comfortable indoor environments.

    “The focus on IAQ is another key trend benefiting ERV, as people become increasingly conscious of the importance to maintain air quality through properly designed and managed HVAC systems,” Energy consultant said in the energy audit survey.

    Market growth for ERVs, Energy consultant said, is driven largely by energy conservation policies that are challenging building custodians to reduce energy consumption for indoor climates. The firm cited as an example the 90.1 standard from American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) which currently dictates “energy recovery systems for applications of 5000 cubic feet per minute (cfm) and larger with 70 percent outside air (OA).”

    ASHRAE 90.1 is a standard that specifies at least 50 percent total effectiveness for ERVs, Energy consultant said.

    The Air Conditioning and Refrigeration Institute and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency also have various standards and regulations regarding energy recovery and IAQ.

    Energy Consultant said two main obstacles lie in the way of more widespread use of ERVs: lack of knowledge and the need to reduce operating costs in the short term. Since building owners and facility managers rely for the most part on contractors to select and install heating, ventilation and air-conditioning (HVAC) equipment, if the contractors are not up-to-speed on ERV developments they may pick products that aren’t as energy-efficient as they could be.

    Also, Energy consultant noted, HVAC contractors work within budgets and therefore tend to buy equipment based on its price rather than long-term cost benefits. It therefore is important to educate contractors about ERVs, and some of that burden falls on manufacturers. The Green Building Council is also playing a role through its Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design program that evaluates buildings to determine the environmental performance during their entire lifecycle.

    ERVs aren’t just good for the planet; they’re good for people, too.

    “The focus on IAQ is another key trend benefiting ERV, as people become increasingly conscious of the importance to maintain air quality through properly designed and managed HVAC systems,” Energy consultant said in the report.

    When IAQ isn’t managed properly, people living or working in unhealthy buildings can develop sick building syndrome from pollutants in the air they breathe.

    “With half of all illnesses attributed to indoor airborne contaminants, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has declared IAQ a public health priority,” Energy consultant said. “Ventilation with outdoor air is the only strategy that can simultaneously reduce the levels of all indoor pollutants.”

    Compiled by: Jay Draiman, Energy analyst – Northridge, CA

  24. Jay Draiman, Energy Analyst says:

    ERV Energy Recovery Ventilation Systems Reduce Long Term Costs and Improve Indoor Air Quality

    Is the indoor air your breathe is as fresh and healthy as it can be?

    As building science professionals have known for some time, an effective ventilation strategy is an absolute requirement for all homes. Mechanical ventilators exchange air inside the home with fresh air from the outside. This helps to reduce indoor pollution levels, and greatly increases the comfort level inside the home.
    Many ventilation designs are including Energy Recovery Ventilators (ERVs) to improve the system efficiency. Besides providing controlled ventilation, ERVs are able to filter, humidify, dehumidify, heat, or cool the incoming fresh air. The most popular design of ERVs utilizes a desiccant wheel to remove both heat and a significant amount of moisture from the incoming air, which reduces the load on the air-conditioning system. But while ventilators and ERVs can add tremendously to the comfort and efficiency of a home, they must be installed correctly.

    One of the more recent developments in the ‘green’ technology industry is the creation of environmentally-friendly buildings that use energy-efficient technologies to reduce power consumption.

    Energy consultants point out that creating ‘green’ buildings and improving the air quality inside such facilities utilizing ERV can and do go hand-in-hand. ERV Systems that reduce demand for energy while improving ventilation are increasingly in demand.

    ERV – Energy Recovery Ventilation systems saves energy, increases indoor air quality, reduces contaminates and odors.

    The use of ERV technology “energy recovery ventilation systems,” or ERVs. Such systems are designed to reduce energy consumption and improve indoor air quality (IAQ) by capturing and recycling building energy to humidify, pre-cool or dehumidify incoming air.

    ERVs, the research first said, are most popular in areas with more extreme outdoor temperatures, like Northern states where winters can get quite cold, or Southern states where very warm temperatures and high humidity demand more energy consumption to maintain comfortable indoor environments.

    “The focus on IAQ is another key trend benefiting ERV, as people become increasingly conscious of the importance to maintain air quality through properly designed and managed HVAC systems,” Energy consultant said in the energy audit survey.

    Market growth for ERVs, Energy consultant said, is driven largely by energy conservation policies that are challenging building custodians to reduce energy consumption for indoor climates. The firm cited as an example the 90.1 standard from American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) which currently dictates “energy recovery systems for applications of 5000 cubic feet per minute (cfm) and larger with 70 percent outside air (OA).”

    ASHRAE 90.1 is a standard that specifies at least 50 percent total effectiveness for ERVs, Energy consultant said.

    The Air Conditioning and Refrigeration Institute and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency also have various standards and regulations regarding energy recovery and IAQ.

    Energy Consultant said two main obstacles lie in the way of more widespread use of ERVs: lack of knowledge and the need to reduce operating costs in the short term. Since building owners and facility managers rely for the most part on contractors to select and install heating, ventilation and air-conditioning (HVAC) equipment, if the contractors are not up-to-speed on ERV developments they may pick products that aren’t as energy-efficient as they could be.

    Also, Energy consultant noted, HVAC contractors work within budgets and therefore tend to buy equipment based on its price rather than long-term cost benefits. It therefore is important to educate contractors about ERVs, and some of that burden falls on manufacturers. The Green Building Council is also playing a role through its Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design program that evaluates buildings to determine the environmental performance during their entire lifecycle.

    ERVs aren’t just good for the planet; they’re good for people, too.

    “The focus on IAQ is another key trend benefiting ERV, as people become increasingly conscious of the importance to maintain air quality through properly designed and managed HVAC systems,” Energy consultant said in the report.

    When IAQ isn’t managed properly, people living or working in unhealthy buildings can develop sick building syndrome from pollutants in the air they breathe.

    “With half of all illnesses attributed to indoor airborne contaminants, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has declared IAQ a public health priority,” Energy consultant said. “Ventilation with outdoor air is the only strategy that can simultaneously reduce the levels of all indoor pollutants.”

    Compiled by: Jay Draiman, Energy analyst – Northridge, CA

  25. John says:

    You can purchase aerogel insulation for less than $5/square foot from Aspen Aerogels today. Go to http://www.aerogel.com.

  26. John says:

    You can purchase aerogel insulation for less than $5/square foot from Aspen Aerogels today. Go to http://www.aerogel.com.

  27. Cindy Larsen says:

    Aspen Aerogel has various products made of aerogel, some of them targeted at the building/construction market. They look very interesting, especially a product called insulcap that is 3/8 inch thick and adds r4 to your walls by placing a strip of it on the studs. Info I haven’t found out yet: health issues? price/sq ft?

    CJ

  28. Cindy Larsen says:

    Aspen Aerogel has various products made of aerogel, some of them targeted at the building/construction market. They look very interesting, especially a product called insulcap that is 3/8 inch thick and adds r4 to your walls by placing a strip of it on the studs. Info I haven’t found out yet: health issues? price/sq ft?

    CJ

  29. Sharif says:

    It is realy great stuff. Is it sold commercially anywhere?
    Which company is producing this material? can it be used in new home building?

  30. Sharif says:

    It is realy great stuff. Is it sold commercially anywhere?
    Which company is producing this material? can it be used in new home building?

  31. kevin says:

    When it is made and it is rigid but flaky and needs to be encapsulated to put in homes and such. What happens when it needs to be cut or fitted into smaller theb board sizes, are you going to have to seal all cut surfaces. What about damage in transport and product sitting in your Home Depot? With flakes coming off and dust particles so small or skin problems. Is it really feasible?

  32. kevin says:

    When it is made and it is rigid but flaky and needs to be encapsulated to put in homes and such. What happens when it needs to be cut or fitted into smaller theb board sizes, are you going to have to seal all cut surfaces. What about damage in transport and product sitting in your Home Depot? With flakes coming off and dust particles so small or skin problems. Is it really feasible?

  33. tommy says:

    What about incorporating it in packing bubbles…

  34. tommy says:

    What about incorporating it in packing bubbles…

  35. Tara says:

    HAHAHAHAHAHAH Aerogel is the coolest stuff on the planet!!!!!

  36. Tara says:

    HAHAHAHAHAHAH Aerogel is the coolest stuff on the planet!!!!!

  37. Tell says:

    Okay I thought this was the coolest idea. When will the prices drop and why?

  38. Tell says:

    Okay I thought this was the coolest idea. When will the prices drop and why?

  39. Randy says:

    PPG industries has a plant in Barterton, Ohio that makes, processes and sells silica powder for the flattening effect on paint (and it’s used in some foods). I think their Low-Vel and Hi-Vel silica product is pretty pure by itself. Yes, I believe it might be more expensive than rice chaff, but it wouldn’t need to be purified as much, thus reducing processing cost and controlling purity.

  40. Randy says:

    PPG industries has a plant in Barterton, Ohio that makes, processes and sells silica powder for the flattening effect on paint (and it’s used in some foods). I think their Low-Vel and Hi-Vel silica product is pretty pure by itself. Yes, I believe it might be more expensive than rice chaff, but it wouldn’t need to be purified as much, thus reducing processing cost and controlling purity.

  41. Pingback: Arogel Insulation in a Tiny House?

  42. BC says:

    Would it be possible to use aerogel for the oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico?

  43. BC says:

    Would it be possible to use aerogel for the oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico?

  44. Chris S says:

    From what I have gathered it takes a lot of time to make Aerogel. First the gel is made from various chemicals, heat is used as well as liquid CO2, then dunked in ethanol or acetone, then dried. This process takes days. You also have to consider shrinkage.

    So you have a lot of obstacles in manufacturing products. Material cost, Heating Cost, Labor and a timely manufacturing process.

  45. Chris S says:

    From what I have gathered it takes a lot of time to make Aerogel. First the gel is made from various chemicals, heat is used as well as liquid CO2, then dunked in ethanol or acetone, then dried. This process takes days. You also have to consider shrinkage.

    So you have a lot of obstacles in manufacturing products. Material cost, Heating Cost, Labor and a timely manufacturing process.

    • Alden says:

      Would it be cost effective for a company to make high end versions of smaller insulation applications for things like pipes and vents maybe watter heaters, also, could it come in a can to seal leaks?

  46. Pingback: Tweets that mention Aerogel Insulation Advances – Green Building Elements -- Topsy.com

  47. Pingback: Silica Aerogel « Mechanical Insulation Guide and Specifications for British Columbia

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