Monthly Archives: February 2007

Vancouver Adaptive Reuse

February 28th, 2007 | by Philip Proefrock

<p><img src="/files/images/koos1.jpg" border="0" alt="cmhc.ca" width="339" height="243" />Photo Credit: cmhc.ca<br />Adaptive reuse is the use of an existing structure for a new purpose; in short, it is recycling for buildings. Rather than demolishing an old structure to clear a site, the existing structure is rehabilitated and used for a new purpose. </p><p><a href="http://www.chestermangroup.com/koos/index.html">Koo's Corner</a> is a project in Vancouver that took an old automotive repair shop and turned it into six urban loft residences. The existing garage building was turned into two of the lofts, and another four units were built to fit the neighborhood context. Building in an existing neighborhood helps to increase urban density (which makes for more efficient use of existing city services) and makes use of available property rather than buldozing undeveloped land for construction.</p>


Insulation Choices

February 26th, 2007 | by Philip Proefrock


Bonded LogicPhoto Credit: Bonded LogicThere are many, many different options available for insulating a building. Whether for new construction or for an addition, there are many manufacturers and different products which all are meant to accomplish essentially the same thing: controlling the temperature inside the building. Without getting into alternate construction methods, consider some options for insulation in standard frame construction.

Insulation is generally material inserted in the spaces between framing (wall studs). It's purpose is to slow down the process of heat transfer. Creating a lot of little airspaces between the fibers of the insulating material, and using a material that is, itself, a poor conductor of heat makes a wall that retains heat, rather than allowing it to be lost to the outside.

Wood Burning = Green Heat?

February 26th, 2007 | by Philip Proefrock

Heat-Kit.comPhoto Credit: Heat-Kit.com
Heating your house with firewood is completely retro. I mean, cutting up trees and burning them, that's just so old fashioned and inefficient, and not green at all.

Right?

What do you mean, wood burning can be green?

In fact, masonry heaters (which are also sometimes called "Finnish heaters" or "Russian heaters") can be a green source for heating a home. While a traditional fireplace may be only 10% efficient (which is to say not!), a masonry heater can be 90% efficient. A well insulated house (even in a cold, Canadian location) can be heated on a single cord of wood per season. In a sense, a masonry heater is to a traditional fireplace what a compact fluorescent (or, even better, and LED light) is to an incandescent bulb.

Meet Your Fellow Greens

February 21st, 2007 | by Philip Proefrock

Do you feel like no one else in your community is interested in a greener lifestyle? Are you interested in meeting other like-minded, green-oriented people in your area? There are opportunities to make new connections and meet others in your community who are similarly inclined towards green living.

Green Drinks is an international program for people from NGOs, academia, government and business. "These events are very simple and unstructured, but many people have found employment, made friends, developed new ideas, done deals and had moments of serendipity. It's a force for the good and we'd like to help it spread to other cities."


Award Winning Chicago Green Building

February 19th, 2007 | by Philip Proefrock

<p><a href="/"><img src="/files/images/wolbrink-elev.img_assist_custom.jpg" border="0" alt=" Chicagoland Avenues " width="200" height="267" /></a><strong>2020 W Rice-Elevation: </strong>Photo Credit: Chicagoland Avenues Green building isn't a style, it's an approach. While there may be common features that appear in many green homes and buildings, there is not a single style that all green buildings follow.</p>


Using Snow & Ice for Energy Analysis

February 15th, 2007 | by Philip Proefrock

zeneraPhoto Credit: zenera
Icicles on the eaves and snow on the roof are more than just an ornament of wintertime. They can also be instructive signs that you can use to get a sense of the way your house is using energy and a way to tell whether or not there are problems that you should address to improve your energy efficiency and perhaps even to preserve your roof structure.

With the recent snow that much of the midwest and northeast US has had in the past week, now can be a good time to take a look at your roof to see how well your house is doing in terms of energy performance. An article from Home Energy Magazine gives a good set of guidelines about reading the snow on your roof to see how well your attic insulation is working


Getting Local Food

February 14th, 2007 | by Philip Proefrock

Brines.orgPhoto credit: Brines.org
There is a huge variety of food available throughout the year in grocery stores in the US. In most places, this is due to several factors: far distant farms situated in temperate climate regions; varieties of plants that have been bred to produce food that will ripen slowly and be hardy enough to withstand the rigors of packaging and shipping; and a transportation infrastructure that brings them to our stores. Unless you live in a southern state, much of the produce in your local stores right now is being shipped from far away.

All that shipping has an associated cost (financial cost as well as energy use and carbon release). Locally grown food has many adherents. There are hundreds of farms operating as community supported agriculture (CSA), where people buy memberships in the farm and receive a share of produce (usually on a weekly basis). CSA farms are wonderful for getting food locally, but they are usually tied to the local growing season, meaning that they don't have produce during the winter. But other options can allow even more extension of the growing season.

Life Cycle Costs

February 12th, 2007 | by Philip Proefrock


One of the biggest concerns about changing to a green lifestyle is, of course, financial. How much does it cost to switch to a green lifestyle?

There is a perception that all of this must be very expensive, and that only altruists and tree-huggers can afford to live this kind of lifestyle. But a green lifestyle needs to be sustainable in all ways.

Something that is more expensive than its alternative will usually cost less in the long run. This is what makes evaluation of green products and green building materials so difficult. But looking at the life-cycle cost (the cost not just of purchasing the item, but also its operation and maintenance over its useful life) can show that the overall cost of the green option is usually lower.


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